An analysis of language extinction and the social political and linguistic consequences

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Language diversity has become greatly endangered in the past centuries owing to processes of language shift from indigenous languages to other languages that are seen as socially and economically more advantageous, resulting in the death or doom of minority languages. In this paper, we define a new language competition model that can describe the historical decline of minority languages in competition with more advantageous languages. We then implement this non-spatial model as an interaction term in a reaction—diffusion system to model the evolution of the two competing languages.

An analysis of language extinction and the social political and linguistic consequences

Personal use only; commercial use is strictly prohibited for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice. Language is fundamentally at work in how we operate as individuals, as members of various communities, and within cultures and societies. As speakers, we learn not only the structure of a given language; we also learn cultural and social norms about how to use language and what content to communicate.

An analysis of language extinction and the social political and linguistic consequences

We use language to navigate expectations, to engage in interpersonal interaction, and to go along with or to speak out against social structures and systems. Sociolinguistics aims to study the effects of language use within and upon societies and the reciprocal effects of social organization and social contexts on language use.

In contemporary theoretical perspectives, sociolinguists view language and society as being mutually constitutive: Language is imbued with and carries social, cultural, and personal meaning.

Through the use of linguistic markers, speakers symbolically define self and society. Simply put, language is not merely content; rather, it is something that we do, and it affects how we act and interact as social beings in the world.

An analysis of language extinction and the social political and linguistic consequences

Language is a social product with rich variation along individual, community, cultural, and societal lines. For this reason, context matters in sociolinguistic research. Sociolinguistic research thus aims to explore social and linguistic diversity in order to better understand how we, as speakers, use language to inhabit and negotiate our many personal, cultural, and social identities and roles.

The Field of Sociolinguistics Although language development and use is a topic of inquiry in many fields, modern sociolinguistics henceforth referred to as sociolinguistics developed in the 20th century.

Koerner primarily situates sociolinguistics within the discipline of linguistics; he narrates sociolinguistics as a diverse field of study that emerged out of earlier traditions in historical linguistics, dialect geography, and the study of bilingualism and multilingualism.

Ferdinand de Saussure as seen in a edition of his lectures, published posthumously developed a theory of semiotics and structuralism that influenced the course of modern linguistic theory and modern sociolinguistic thought.

He asserts the arbitrary nature of the sign that is attached to the signified as well as the significance of considering how time and geographical diversity affect linguistic change.

Saussurean linguistics was influential in a number of directions. It influenced the principle of linguistic relativity, also known as the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis, as formulated by linguist Edward Sapir and his student Benjamin Lee Whorf see Whorf, This principle helped initiate a shift from the view of language as a mirror of mental processes to the suggestion that language influences thought by conditioning our observations and evaluations.

Vygotskyin psychology, also was influenced by Saussure. Erving Goffmana central figure in sociology and linguistics, studied language as central to social interaction.

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Goffman is widely known for his work on the concept of framing: Also influenced by Saussure were Norman Fairclough and Pierre Bourdieuboth eminently concerned with the relationship among language, capital, power, and society. Faircloughinfluential in furthering the area known as critical discourse analysis, argues that discourse produces, enacts, maintains, directs, and challenges power in society.

From analyzing discourse, power dynamics and the ideologies that support them can be revealed. From sociology, Bourdieu also links language to power. Sociolinguistics is still allied with anthropology but has less in common with sociology now than it once did, and today most sociolinguists receive training primarily in linguistics Shuy, Particularly influential is the linguist William Labov, who is widely regarded as the scholar who has had the greatest influence on sociolinguistics in the contemporary era Hazen, Viewed as the founder of variationist sociolinguistics, Labov established modern methodologies for collecting and analyzing data from language in use and was a leader in applying sociolinguistic research to address educational challenges.

Language Variation and Change A primary aim of sociolinguistics is to consider language variation and change in relation to social factors and effects.

The authors challenge prior linguistic theories that had rested on assumptions of homogeneity. Since that time, language variation and change has emerged as a major area of sociolinguistic study, particularly due to the pioneering research of William Labov.

The trilogy of LabovLabovand Labov is a go-to source on language variation and change.

Chris Rogers and Lyle Campbell

The first volume Labov, explores internal factors:Linguists argue that language endangerment is an extremely serious problem, one with great humanistic and scientific consequences.

The Consequences of Language Loss Sociolinguists and anthropological linguists are only now beginning to understand the effects of language loss or shift on communities. May 06,  · Language diversity has become greatly endangered in the past centuries owing to processes of language shift from indigenous languages to other languages that are seen as socially and economically more advantageous, resulting in the death or doom of minority languages.

Linguists argue that language endangerment is an extremely serious problem, one with great humanistic and scientific consequences.

The Consequences of Language Loss Sociolinguists and anthropological linguists are only now beginning to understand the effects of language loss or shift on communities.

Endangered Languages - Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Linguistics

The discussion about endangered languages focuses on addressing the needs, causes, and consequences of this leslutinsduphoenix.comn over endangered languages is not just an academic catch phrase.

It involves real people and communities struggling with real social, political, and economic issues. The discussion about endangered languages focuses on addressing the needs, causes, and consequences of this leslutinsduphoenix.comn over endangered languages is not just an academic catch phrase.

It involves real people and communities struggling with real social, political, and economic issues. Language endangerment affects both the languages themselves and the people that speak them.

Effects on communities: As communities lose their language they often also lose parts of their cultural traditions which are tied to that language, such as songs, myths and poetry that are not easily transferred to another language.

Language extinction and linguistic fronts | Journal of The Royal Society Interface